Avainsana-arkisto: Nanoparticles

Akvaattisen ekotoksikologian käytännön töitä laboranttiharjoittelijan silmin

Kun aloitin harjoittelun, oli käynnissä matokoe. Kokeessa tutkittiin, miten erilaiset pohjasedimenttien fullereenipitoisuudet vaikuttavat harvasukasmatoihin. Kokeeseen liittyi työtehtävinä mm. veden pH-mittausta ja happipitoisuuden mittausta. Myös näytteiden pohjasedimentin pH:ta mitattiin. Jos veden pH oli matopurkeissa liian alhainen, niiden vesi piti vaihtaa.

Harvasukasmatokoe eri fullereenipitoisuuksilla.
Harvasukasmatokoe eri fullereenipitoisuuksilla.

Ennen kuin aloitettiin uusi matokoe, leikattiin harvasukasmatoja kahtia. Hännät säästettiin seuraavaan kokeeseen. Ennen kuin fullereenisuspensio oli lisätty pohjasedimenttiin, suspension pitoisuus oli tarkistettu UV/Vis-spektrometrilla. Matokokeeseen tehtiin myös keinotekoista makeaa vettä. Siihen tarvittiin magnesiumsulfaatti-, kalsiumkloridi-, kaliumkloridi-ja natriumkarbonaattiliuoksia sekä milliQ –vettä. Näitä kaikkia lisättiin suureen pulloon ja sekoitetaan magneettisekoittajalla. Liuoksen pH mitattiin ja säädettiin.

Matokokeessa madot laitettiin purkkeihin, jossa on pohjalla sedimenttiä ja kvartsihiekkaa ja niiden yläpuolella keinotekoista makeaa vettä. Purkkien sedimentteihin on lisätty kolmea eri fullereenipitoisuutta. Sedimentti oli otettu järven pohjalta. Purkkeja oli hapetettu yön yli. Kaikkiin purkkeihin lisättiin 10 matoa. Madot saivat olla purkeissa kaksi viikkoa, eikä niitä hapetettu. Matopurkkien pH-arvoja ja happipitoisuuksia mitattiin kokeen aikana. Näytepurkeista kerättiin myös pellettiä useaan kertaan. Pelletit suodatettiin ja niiden paino mitattiin. Kun kaksi viikkoa oli kulunut, seuloimme matopurkkien madot. Mittasimme iltapäivällä kaikkien matopurkkien matojen painon ja laitoimme ne koeputkiin suolaliuokseen. Koeputket laitettiin pakastimeen.

Pellettien suodattaminen.
Pellettien suodattaminen.

Ekotoksikologian kasvatushuoneessa kasvatetaan kirppuja, harvasukasmatoja ja surviaissääskiä. Niitä ruokitaan kolmesti viikossa. Kirppualtaiden vedet vaihdetaan kerran viikossa. Myös muiden eläinten altaiden vedet vaihdetaan kerran viikossa.

Harvasukasmatojen kasvatusallas.
Harvasukasmatojen kasvatusallas.

Vesikirpuilla tehtiin toksisuuskokeita. Ensin tehtiin akuutteja toksisuuskokeita. Fullereenisuspensio suodatettiin ja sen pitoisuus mitattiin UV/Vis-spektrometrilla. Sitten tehtiin akuutti toksisuuskoe, jossa käytettiin toisena altistavana aineena fullereenia. Sitten aloitettiin kemikaalien yhteisvaikutuksia tutkiva pitkäaikainen toksisuuskoe vesikirpuilla. Kyseessä on lisääntymiskoe. Kokeessa voidaan tutkia useita vesikirppusukupolvia ja niiden jälkeläistuotantoa, sukupuolijakaumaa ja emokirppujen kokoa. Vesikirppujen sukupuolta tutkitaan mikroskoopilla. Pitkäaikainen toksisuuskoe on vielä kesken. Vesikirppujen toksisuuskokeet liittyvät erään opiskelijan pro gradu -tutkimukseen.

Vesikirppuja käytetään kemikaalien toksisuuden arvioinnissa, tässä tutkitaan vaikutuksia lisääntymiseen.
Vesikirppuja kemikaalien toksisuuden arvioinnissa.

Tein harjoittelun lopuksi kaksi näyttöä:

  1. Fullereenisuspension pitoisuusmääritys UV-Vis-spektrometrillä
  2. Vesikirppujen sukupuolijakauman ja emojen pituuden määritys kemikaalien yhteisvaikutuksia tutkivassa pitkäaikaiskokeessa

Teksti ja kuvat Päivi Hämäläinen

Onnittelut myös Päiville hyvin suoritetuista tutkinnonosista!

Nice handwork and beautiful lab ware – building up the experiment and the first sampling

In my previous post, I told about preparations before an experiment can be started. Some more preparations  were still needed while the worms were creating new heads. Exposure sediments should be prepared – spiked, as we call it. Necessary amount of fullerenes to be added to the sediment was calculated after determining concentration of the fullerene suspension; concentration measurements are pretty beautiful, because of the purple color of fullerenes in the measuring solution.  Spiking is done by “a home-made spiking machine”, which means a metal blade stirred by a drill: it provides forceful mixing of chemical to sediment. Also, artificial freshwater for exposure jars was prepared.

Spiking the sediment with fullerene nanoparticles.
Preparing everything for the experiment. In the middle, spiking the sediment with fullerene nanoparticles.

Everything was finally ready for building up the experiment: spiked sediment, size-synchronized worms and artificial freshwater. The next step was building up the exposure jars with an aeration system. At first, the sediment was placed on the bottom and then artificial freshwater was carefully poured above the sediment. No matter how you pour the water, you always have a blended mix which has to let settle for one or two days before aeration can be started and the worms added. The next step is to let the exposure go on and maintain pH and oxygen content at suitable level for the worms.

Microcosmos with Lumbriculus variegatus, the tubes are for aeriation.
Microcosmos with Lumbriculus variegatus, the tubes are for aeriation. On the right, the worms are in their typical feeding position.

After 7 days it was time to collect the first worm samples, which means whole-day handwork. And how to carry that out? The exposure sediment was poured to a sieve and then carefully seek and pick up every worm using a dentist tool.

In the end, you must find your worms. Sieving is a handy method for that.
In the end, you must find your worms. Sieving is a handy method for that.

The worms are put to clean water to empty their guts before they are ready to be weighed in hand-made –how else 😉 – tiny foil cups. After recording wet weights, the worms are either dried or transferred to a freezer waiting for fullerene analysis.

Our laboratorian trainee Risto Pöhö weighing the worms at the end of the experiment. Note the handy tool for making weighing cups.
Our laboratorian trainee Risto Pöhö weighing the worms at the end of the experiment. Note the handy tool for making weighing cups.

Text by Kukka Pakarinen

Pictures by Kaisa Figueiredo, Risto Pöhö, and Kukka Pakarinen

Here we go again – Many steps to an experiment on black worms

After a year as a teacher I came back to research in aquatic ecotoxicology. I’ll test a method to analyze fullerene nanoparticles in separated tissue fractions of black worms. Simply, I’ll expose the worms to fullerenes, collect organisms, fractionate their tissues, and then measure fullerene concentrations in each tissue fraction. But starting a new experiment requires a plenty of preparations in the lab before actual test can be started. Here I tell what is going on during the first two weeks.

I would need a test sediment treated with fullerenes. For the test sediment, I would need fullerenes suspended to water to be added to a natural sediment from Lake Höytiäinen. Luckily, we already had the sediment in our lab… if we didn’t have, I would have to wait for winter to go to the field and collect it through ice… I would also need my test species, black worms, synchronized to similar physiological condition.

Sediment sampling. Pictures by Kristiina Väänänen and Jarkko Akkanen
Sediment sampling during winter time.

As a very first job, I prepared artificial freshwater, which means a lab-made model of fresh water corresponding “average Finnish freshwater” with its hardness. Then, I used that water to suspend fullerenes. Making fullerene suspension takes time: fullerene powder must be vigorously mixed with water for two weeks before it can be used in the experiment. This mixing process must be done because fullerenes are not soluble in water, but they turn to water-stabile form via water flows and mixing. And when thinking about fullerenes’ fate in natural waters, they can enter to the environment e.g. in waste waters. Thus, water suspension is their first step to bottom sediments. Read more about fullerenes’ environmental fate here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/etc.2175/full

Fullerene suspension, picture by Kukka Pakarinen
Fullerene suspension.

Black worms are sediment-dwelling benthic worms. They have important ecological roles in aquatic ecosystems as a food source for fish and as decomposers of sediment material. They can be exposed to fullerenes via wasted sediments. In this experiment I’ll need size-synchronized worms, as some other researchers in our group. That’s why we organized “a worm cutting day” to synchronize more than thousand worms. It means that four of us sat a day in the culture room picking worms from their aquariums to petri dishes, and then separating their head parts and tail parts by a surgeon knife: the head parts grow new tails and tail parts grow new heads. How to identify which part is which? Color of the head is a bit black and thicker whereas the tail is red and thinner. Then, we’ll wait for couple of weeks to let the worms create these new parts. Finally, we’ll get test worms with same size and condition. Dividing to heads and tails is also a normal way to reproduce for the black worms. Read more about fullerene-exposed black worms here: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0269749111003848

Worm cutting day
Worm cutting day
Head part, tail part and cutting
Head part, tail part and cutting

While fullerene suspension and the worms are underway, I can do some other preparations. Sediment dry weight must be known to adjust volume of fullerene suspension. Preparations for the dry weight could be favorite job for kids: wet sediment is homogenized with a perforated piston before samples are placed to weighing jars and dried.

Mixing and weighing the sediments
Mixing and weighing the sediments

Next week it’s time to measure fullerene concentration in the suspension, add fullerenes to sediment and let them stay to equilibrate before the experiment.

Text by Kukka Pakarinen

Pictures by Jarkko Akkanen, Kristiina Väänänen, Kukka Pakarinen, and Risto Pöhö