How to improve PhD supervision?

Are you a great supervisor? Or are you a PhD student, who is excellent in getting all the supervision he/she needs? If not, read our tips for improving yourself!

University of Eastern Finland and TOHTOS project co-organized a seminar and a workshop for PhD students and their supervisors. Our aim was to find the best practices and tools for successful supervision. Here is a list of our results:

Tips for supervisors (by Sanna Vehviläinen)

  1. Get to know the problem to get it solved. The problem might be something else than it seems at the first glance.
  2. Let your student know that you are willing to help, have common rules for communication.
  3. Have informal discussions (coffee breaks, Happy Fridays).
  4. Make sure that you are aiming at the same goals. Establish a culture.
  5. Stimulate student’s thinking by feedback. Let the student process and understand.

Tips for PhD students

  1. Tell your goals, working style and communication style to your supervisor.
  2. Have goals and structure for all your meetings with your supervisor. Send information beforehand and make memos.
  3. Find your networks and meet your colleagues in informal settings.
  4. Balance your working life and free time.

 

Wish to read more tips and some research background on the subject?

Text by Kristiina Väänänen, pictures Pixabay (CC0)

UEF Ecotox goes SciFest® with science-oriented day care centre Pilke Loiste

Joensuu has been hosting the yearly international science festival SciFest® already since 2007, bringing together thousands of school kids, high school students, and teachers to discover new experiences and learn about science, technology and the environment. SciFest takes place every spring and is free and open to everyone.  This year was a very special year, since for the first time in the history of SciFest, also early childhood education, Pilke Päiväkodit, was represented as an organizer of a workshop.

Early childhood educators of Pilke Loiste and Hepokatti ready to welcome the first visitors to the workshop.

In the neighborhood of Rantakylä, Joensuu, we have a science-oriented day care centre Pilke Loiste. The day care centre has been operating since August 2017, and has been an excellent addition to the educational diversity of Joensuu. The day care centre Pilke Loiste has initiated co-operation with the Science Park of Joensuu, KideScience and their superb teacher Niko Kyllönen, as well as Luma-keskus and some researchers at UEF. They even participated the Epic Challenge project earlier this year with great success and had a chance to meet astronaut Dr. Charles Camarda.

But what does this have to do with our Ecotox group, or this blog? Well, our post-doc researcher Kaisa obviously signed up her two children into Pilke Loiste already months before it was officially opened, and all this has been a huge success in terms of excellent early childhood education AND education in science. As a mother of two, and as a researcher, Kaisa has been in close co-operation with the day care centre since its early days, and SciFest did not really bring an exception to this either.

A research scientist and her preschool-aged son representing Pilke Loiste at SciFest 2018.

We started to the plan the workshop already months before the actual event. The idea was to combine science with arts in some way, as this was the specific theme of SciFest this year. We joined our forces with a music-oriented day care centre Pilke Hepokatti , located in the neighborhood of Noljakka, Joensuu. Since the target group of the workshop were children between 5-8 years, we wanted to bring some simple scientific experiments into the workshop.

The first experiment was to fill a balloon without blowing – using only vinegar and sodium bicarbonate, in order to make the children understand reactions between chemicals. Another experiment was about surface tension – how many water drops could a coin tolerate on its top before sinking from the water surface? Kaisa then came along with a third task to the workshop – creating a food chain/web together with the children, using special educational cards from WWF, meant for learning biological interactions between organisms. Additionally, on the first day of the festival the kids could also create their own music using iPads lead by the head of music-oriented day care centre Pilke Hepokatti.

Pupils from Kanervala school working on a food chain.

To give a better example of the biological diversity of the Finnish lakes and rivers, Kaisa brought some live organisms (water fleas, Oligochaete worms and Chironomids in real water/sediment) from our culture room to present to the kids. Surprisingly, most of the children had no clue about what a water flea was, or that there exists life also at the bottom sediments of our lakes and rivers. This definitely was a nice opportunity to introduce our aquatic research of UEF EnvBio and Ecotox to visitors of the workshop. We held the workshop during two days, from 9-12 both days, and approximately 60 visitors participated the workshop each day, added with some international groups from Iran and Germany, that were very interested in our workshop and the educational concept of Pilke Loiste in general. The feedback about our workshop was very positive overall.

I have been permitted to report now, that the next year 2019 Pilke Loiste will take part in SciFest again as a workshop organizer, and Pilke Loiste has also been invited to join the strategy group of SciFest, to make the event even better in the coming years. This definitely was a huge success, and an excellent opportunity to bring science-oriented education some publicity.

Laboratory organisms meet SciFest 2018.

Quick facts about SciFest 2018: More than 9000 participants, over 30 countries, and 70+ workshops. We will meet again next year in April 25-27, 2019!!

Text and photos: Kaisa Figueiredo

Due to restrictions in rights of publishing photos of other children, mostly Kaisa’s own kids appear in this blog post (with the kind permission of their mother).

How to find a work after PhD?

You got your PhD diploma in your hand, but not a job. What then? As promised in our previous blog post, we’ll talk about how to find a job after getting your PhD.

If your dream career is within academia:

  1. Write a research plan and apply funding for your own postdoc project. There are several foundations and organizations giving out money for post docs. If you include an international research period to your application, your chances of getting the grant are better. Check the application deadlines!
  2. Apply for open postdoc positions (in Finland and abroad). Check www.mol.fi, open positions in LinkedIn and Twitter, plus open positions in the universities’ web sites.
  3. Contact your networks to ask, if they have anything available: Ask your supervisors and cooperation partners, let the people in social media know that you are looking for a job.
  4. Are there any openings (or possibilities for open applications) in research organizations outside universities? In Finland, these could include Geological Survey of Finland, Finnish Environment Institute, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Technical Research Centre of Finland.
  5. Network! If none of the previous options worked for you, widen your horizon. Go to courses, conferences and seminars. Do voluntary work in your field-related organizations. Join a mentoring program. Learn new and get to know new people. Don’t be shy, go and talk to people. Tell them who you are and that you are looking for a place to do your postdoc.
  6. Make sure that your skills are up-to-date, for example by using the following Research Development Framework.
Research Development Framework by www.vitae.ac.uk

 

If you would like to step outside the academia:

  1. Apply for open positions and send open applications to local government, central government and third sector.
  2. Look for the possibilities in the private sector. What kind of companies hire doctors from your field? Sell your expertise!
  3. Are there suitable vacancies abroad?
  4. Participate all kinds of job-seeking events and “improve your CV/job interview skills” – clinics. Join a mentoring program.
  5. Learn, how to sell your expertise to a company. They are not interested on your publication list or diploma – they are interested in what you have learned during your PhD studies and how can you apply the knowledge to practice.

 

What happened to me once I got my diploma?

I have always wanted to be somewhere in the middle – between the research, administration and private sector. Few months before I got my PhD diploma, I started job-hunting. I polished my CV and elevator pitch with my mentor, participated in an international job-hunting event (thanks SETAC Europe), sent five applications to government jobs, applied for one postdoc position and for two administration jobs in university, wrote a research plan (with international mobility) and applied money from five foundations. What was the result? Two job interviews, one job and one 6-month research grant.

 

Text by Kristiina Väänänen, pictures Pixabay (cc0)

What comes after PhD? Career prospects for doctors

You have your PhD diploma in your hand, what now? This has been a relevant question in our research group during the past few years. In spite of being extremely happy about completing the PhD, there is a nagging feeling in your head: Am I going to find a job and my place in the working life?

According to a study by University of Eastern Finland (UEF), our future is rather bright. The recently graduated Joe Average from UEF is unemployed only for a short period. Within 6 months, Joe finds a job in the field of research. Most likely, he gets a permanent full-time position. His salary is 3 000–4 000 euros per month and he works in a university. Not too bad, isn’t it!

The Joe Average – a new PhD graduate from University of Eastern Finland.

 

After completing the PhD, 20% of the doctors from UEF did not have a job. Fortunately, the unemployment periods were short: half of the people found a new job within the first 6 months, and 24% more within the first year. If there were 100 doctors, 80 of them would find job right away. From the 20 persons without a job, 10 would find one in 6 months and 5 more in 12 months. After one year from graduation, 5 would still be looking for a job.

Doctors get more money and interesting tasks

The working life of recent doctors sounds interesting: Most of the young doctors got better salary, more demanding tasks, and a better position, after having their doctorate. A quarter of them were hired for a new position.

Where are the new PhDs from Ecotox group working at the moment?

Are the people from our ecotox group the Joe Averages? Partly, yes. Almost half of our recent doctors (PhD less than 5 years ago) work in the university as a researcher – half of them in Finland and the other half abroad.  Most of us have had a short unemployment period before finding the job. In most of the cases, we were not lucky enough to get permanent positions. But, on the other hand, we have real salary instead of research grant.

How to become a better contestant in job-hunting market?

If you are still a PhD student, use your time wisely. Pay attention to networking, do your work as well as possible, participate in extra-curriculum activities, spend enough time to learn transferable skills (e.g., project management, communications, reporting, financing). Also, recognize and learn the skills in your own field, which you may be missing. If you already have your diploma in your hands, stay tuned of our upcoming post about job hunting.

One of us is working to find jobs for doctors

The current job of our most recent PhD, Krista, is to help PhD students in developing their working life skills/relevance. The most important goal for her is to help doctors getting jobs, also outside the academia. Latest updates of this Tohtos project are found on Twitter, @tohtos.

Text and figures by Kristiina Väänänen

From MSc to PhD – how the process goes at UEF! Part 2.

Public examination

Public examination, or defense, starts always precisely at noon. Rather strict dress code is taken into consideration. Audience enters to the auditorium at 12, and fifteen minutes later, the PhD candidate walks in, together with the custos and the opponent. The examination begins with lectio praecursia, a short introductory lecture about the topic of the dissertation.  After that, the opponent gives a short introduction into the topic. Custos, sitting between the candidate and the opponent, has an important role in the defense: he opens the public examination and is responsible that everything goes by the protocol. Also, he has to make sure that the opponent and candidate do not end up in a fight. During the examination, the opponent makes questions to the candidate – sometimes very easy ones, sometimes rather difficult. The candidate’s task is to answer to the questions as well as he/she can, and to have interactive conversation upon the topic with the opponent.

Some tough questions in Krista’s public examination.

Finally, after opponent’s final statement, the custos closes the examination. But before that, the doctoral candidate must turn to the audience to ask, if someone has something to say against the thesis. Usually no one raises the hand. In case someone does,  the PhD candidate should politely invite him/her to the karonkka party later in the evening (and the person making the question should politely reject the invitation). Duration of the public examination is normally 2-3 hours, but in the official rules, the opponent can spend up to 5 hours for examining the thesis. After examination, the audience is invited for coffee and cake, or sparkling wine and snacks.  This is normally the moment, when the PhD candidate can breath freely for the first time!!

It is time for some snacs after the public defence.

Karonkka

Karonkka is a well-prepared dinner party in the honor of the opponent, usually held in a restaurant or ball room with a fancy dinner and appropriate drinks. The evening begins with a toast proposed by the PhD candidate, followed by a dinner. Later on, it is time for the speeches. The PhD candidate is  the first one to give a speech and thank everyone who have had a role in the process of thesis making, such as the opponent, custos, supervisors, colleagues, co-authors, friends and family. In this order. There is also an unwritten rule saying that everyone whose name has been mentioned in the speech, must give a speech too. Family members may, however, skip giving the speeches, if they wish. Toasts are proposed between every speech, and the PhD candidate must make sure that the opponent’s glass is never empty. At the same time it is good to take care that your opponent does not drink too much! (Yes, we have also experienced this).

Take enough time for your Karonkka preparations! Krista is preparing her decorations.

Degree certificate

Finally, after the public examination and karonkka are over, the opponent has two weeks to give his or her statement on the thesis and defense. The faculty board must accept the defense and decide on a note: accepted or accepted with honor, which approximately 5% of of the doctoral theses are awarded with. Only after this the candidate can apply for a degree certificate and call him/herself  a doctor.

Universities arrange conferment ceremonies every now and then, approximately once every 5 years. The next ceremony at UEF in Joensuu will take place in 2019. These are 3-day-long celebrations of appreciation for persons who have completed their doctoral degree. Participation is not compulsory, but at least in the past a doctor received a permission to use the doctoral hat (or sword in some faculties) only after being ”promoted” in a doctoral conferment ceremony.

Let us introduce our two newest doctors: Kaisa and Kristiina! (they do not yet have the fancy, doctoral hats) Congratulations!! Who shall be the next?

Kaisa and Krista got their doctorates!

 

Text and pictures by Kaisa Figueiredo and Kristiina Väänänen

 

From MSc to PhD – how the process goes at UEF! Part 1.

Every university and institution has its own requirements and procedures for the PhD thesis, defense and everything related to it, beginning from the process of applying for a PhD student position. From time to time we hear experiences from our neighboring countries through colleagues and co-workers. There are many differences between the processes, but also, many similarities. One thing in common is the thesis. Every PhD student must write a thesis, and have a public examination upon the thesis.

We have already written many posts about the daily life of a PhD student, so we will not go into details in this post. You can read more for example here, here and here. From now on we will concentrate on what happens, once the thesis is about to be ready.

Checking the layout practices from the previously printed PhD theses.

The process of thesis making

In natural sciences at UEF, a PhD thesis consists of 3-5 scientific articles, of which at least two must have been peer-reviewed and published (or at least accepted for publication) before public examination. The PhD thesis includes a thorough summary, where the most important findings of the articles have been summed up, to make a readable context that makes sense. At UEF, all PhD students are in a Doctoral School, consisting of 15 different doctoral programmes. Most of the biology students, Kaisa and Kristiina included, have made their thesis and studies at the doctoral programme of environmental physics, health and biology. The doctoral school and  programmes offer courses, and in some cases also grants for PhD students.

It is hard work to get data for you PhD thesis! Sampling campaign in Lake Junttiselkä.

Preparing for the pre-evaluation and public examination

When the thesis is ready, the main supervisor (in co-operation with the faculty officers) proposes two pre-examiners for the thesis manuscript. Not just anyone can act as a pre-examiner, because there are many requirements for one: Must be an experienced scientist, preferably a professor or at least an adjunct professor (we call it ”dosentti” here in Finland). Also, the pre-examiner is not supposed to have any co-operation with the PhD candidate, not reside at the same department or even the same university. Preferably, at least one of the pre-examiners should from a foreign country.  The pre-examiners are given two months for examining the thesis before they need to give a statement for accepting it or not. In some cases, the pre-examiners provide useful tips for improving the quality of thesis, which should be taken into consideration before sending the thesis to press. Since at least two of the articles of the PhD thesis have already been peer-reviewed and accepted, and also the supervisors have proofread and accepted the thesis for pre-examination, the statement is positive in most of the cases. But the process in still important for maintaining the quality of the theses.

The dean gives a permission for defense (väitöslupa) only after two positive statements from the pre-examiners. Then, the thesis goes to language revision and finally to press (Grano at UEF). This process might take up to two weeks, or even longer, if the first draft does not come out in a perfect shape. The printed books get delivered to the candidate before defense, and one copy must be delivered to the library at least 10 days before the defense. Also, a publishing agreement must be written with the UEF library. The library officers offer the key words and classification number for the thesis. This must all be done before sending the thesis to press. A press release must be prepared too, following the instructions of the communications and media relations department.

Also, a proposal for opponent and custos must be made in advance for the faculty. However, this cannot be done before the permission of defense has been obtained.

Remember also:

  • Do not forget to send invitations!
  • Official photo must be taken at a local photographer in advance!
  • Agreement on the dresscode together with custos and opponent.
  • Check the availability and reserve the auditorium in advance, otherwise you will not have options!

What to expect for your defence day? Stay tuned for part 2!

Text: Kaisa Figueiredo

Photos: Kaisa Figueiredo and Kristiina Väänänen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SETAC went to Brazil

Whenever we ecotoxicologists have something to present to the big audience, we participate the meetings organized by the society of environmental toxicology and chemistry SETAC.  The mission of the society is to support the development of principles and practices for protection, enhancement and management of sustainable environmental quality and ecosystem integrity. Additionally, SETAC promotes the advancement and application of scientific research related to contaminants and other stressors in the environment, education in the environmental sciences, and the use of science in environmental policy and decision-making. The society also provides a forum where scientists, managers, and other professionals exchange information and ideas for the development and use of multidisciplinary scientific principles and practices leading to sustainable environmental quality.

SETAC audience discussing microplastic pollution in Santos, Brazil.

Annual meetings of SETAC take place annually or biennially in different geographical regions, and our group members mostly participate the European and North American annual meetings held every year, as was the case also in 2016 and 2017. SETAC Latin America organized a biennial meeting in September 2017, and I had an opportunity to participate such an event for the first time. My previous SETAC experiences were from three North American meetings, so I thought I could somehow imagine what to expect. But after all, the experience was far beyond that I could ever have imagined beforehand.

SETAC Latin America 12th Biennial Meeting is about to start.

Whereas the North American and European SETAC meetings have about 2000-3000 participants yearly, SETAC Latin America 12th Biennial Meeting this year gathered just about 500 participants. Altogether 17 countries were represented, and a few participants, like myself, came across the ocean from Europe and Asia – me being the only one representative from UEF and the whole Finland. The conference was held in Santos, a coastal city in São Paulo state in Brazil. Everything was smaller and simpler compared to the NA and European meetings – more intimate and informal somehow. In my opinion it was easier to meet new people, get to know them, and talk about science and beyond. Just the fact that I came from Finland, already created an interesting base for various discussions during the sessions, lunch breaks or just in an elevator going from the 1st floor up to the 5th. I got so much courage and confidence about myself by traveling alone and being forced to integrate to the community beginning from the inaugural session. I did not know anyone from there before traveling, but when I came back, I had many new friends and experiences to take home. Who knows, maybe we will have some co-operation with our Brazilian colleagues in the future!?

Definitely not the worst place in the world to attend a scientific conference!

This was the first time ever that I participated in a conference with three official languages: English, Spanish and Portuguese. Most Latin Americans gave their presentations in their own language, mostly in Portuguese, naturally, because the conference was held in Brazil where most of the participants came from. Fortunately I could understand all three languages, but I felt pity for the North American, European and Asian participants who could only follow the slides, which in most cases were in English though. Q&A part was a mixture of all three.  Extremely confusing, but interesting. The actual conference days consisted of platform presentations in the morning, lectures and round table discussions in the afternoon, and poster sessions at 6-8 pm. Lunch breaks were long and gave a nice opportunity to have a little runaway to the beachfront closeby before the next session.

Poster session of the 2nd conference day.

My impression was that the hot topics in ecotoxicology in Latin America are the effects of pesticides to the environment (agriculture is strong in LA) and topics related to pollution of the ocean. Metals and nanomaterials are only now making its way to the Latin American field of ecotoxicology, whereas in Europe and North America they have been a hot topic already for several years. I took with me two posters from Finland, one about my own research about PCB bioaccumulation and passive samplers, and another of Kukka’s and mine, about joint effects of traditional xenobiotics and nanoparticles on aquatic species. The poster session was a success: many interesting dialogues I had, and many new friends I made. This was also the first time that I could present something in my second best language: Portuguese. Everything went better than I excepted, and next time in SETAC Latin America Biennial Meeting, which will be held in 2019, in Cartagena de Indias, Colombia, I will definitely encourage myself to have a platform presentation in that language, too. This experience was a wonderful experience as a researcher and gave an interesting insight into ecotoxicology in Latin America. This was also a prefect getaway from my daily routines in order start preparing for my PhD defense, which was about to follow soon after coming back home.

Me and my posters.

The conference trip was financed by Unipid FinCEAL+ program for international mobility between Finland, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), financed by the Finnish Ministry of Education and Culture. The great adventure has also been documented on Instagram and Twitter @uef_ecotox.

Text and photos by Kaisa Figueiredo

 

 

 

A strong relationship with Joensuu

Moi,

This is Joan, a Spaniard environmental scientist ,who was born some years ago in a very small village called Moixent, located in the southwestern part (the warmest area) of València, Spain. My experience in Joensuu goes back more than 5 years, when in September 2012 I landed in Helsinki after being accepted as an exchange student for the whole academic year at the University of Eastern Finland. I still remember that long journey: Moixent-Madrid-Oslo-Helsinki-Joensuu. Yes, it took more than 24 hours to arrive to my new apartment, located firstly in Tikkarinne, and later on in Karjamäentie.

Enjoying the Midsummer night at Kevo Subartic Research Station, Lapland

New city, new people, new food, new culture, new language… and of course first time studying for part of my Bachelor’s in English (quite challenging at the beginning I must admit). Back then, I took a couple of courses in aquatic ecosystems taught by Dr. Jarkko Akkanen, who without knowing then, would later become the supervisor of my Master’s thesis. Furthermore, in one of the courses, I had the pleasure of meeting Sebastian; but, I will talk about him soon.

I hardly realized it, and May 2013 arrived.  31st of May, the time to pack, to say “see you soon” to a lot of wonderful people…It was the time to start another 24 hours’ journey back to my hometown (drama, drama), but keeping in mind just one thing: I will be back in Joensuu, sooner or later!

The last academic year of my Bachelor’s started in September 2013.  As you can imagine, half of my heart was left in this amazing city; quite close to the Russian border, and surrounded by lakes and hectares of forest where you can enjoy the Northern lights. Just one mission on my mind: get my Bachelor’s diploma as soon as possible and apply for a Master Programme at the University of Eastern Finland.

Northern lights, revontulet in finnish at Joensuu’s sky

I didn’t tell anyone (not even my parents), and in May 2015 I got a letter at home: “Dear Joan, it is my pleasure to inform you that you have been accepted in a 2 years Master Programme in Environmental Science at UEF”. Yeah, August was the month to pack again, apply for a new flat and look for the fastest way to get to Joensuu. This time it took 10 hours, not bad at all (you learn from your experiences)!

The academic year started in September, and I was fully ready to meet old and new friends, learn as much as possible, and enjoy every single day of this opportunity. First year of the Master was complete, and at this point, it was the moment to choose the topic of my thesis. After being trained in different research groups, I made a decision: “I want to do the thesis in the Aquatic Ecotoxicology Group”.

So, after some informal meetings with Jarkko and Sebastian (yes, the guy that I met in 2012, became my second supervisor), we got a topic: “improved application system for activated carbon based sediment remediation”.  Briefly, we are evaluating the efficiency of granular activated carbon vs. carbon pellets to verify which one has better remediation capability (PCB bioaccumulation) by causing fewer unfriendly effects on the aquatic community (Lumbriculus variegatus has been used as toxicity test organisms). In the laboratory I had the chance to meet the other colleagues of the group: Marja, Kukka, Kaisa, Kristiina, Bhabishya, Victor and Eric. I have to thank you all for being such a great group of people and for all the help (specially, in making you some space at the office by taking boxes)!

PCB bioaccumulation (left); growth and reproduction (right) test set up

Experiments were finished by the Ilosaarirock 2017 weekend and currently I’m in process to write the thesis. Nowadays, this process is being done in Denmark, where I moved at the beginning of January 2018 for a four months’ internship on microplastics remediation at the Nordcee Institute, University of Southern Denmark.

Don’t think I have forgotten you, because Joensuu and the Ecotox Group is each single day in my mind, and I will do my best to be back in town and continue my career with the group! Thanks all of you for accepting and for giving me all the knowledge in Aquatic Ecotoxicology!

Have a nice Spring,

Joan

Text and photos by Joan Carreres

An adventure in Joensuu

On the 14th of March in 2017 I left Valencia with 30 degrees, nervous but excited, because I knew that an amazing experience was starting. I arrived in Helsinki, and after some delay I landed in Joensuu, where it was full of snow and 50 degrees lower than when I took off. Someone that I didn’t met before was waiting (some hour more because the delay) for me at the airport, Sebastian, who took me to my new home. I couldn’t get in this house if Kaisa hadn’t taken the keys at Joensuun Elli student housing office.

Landing on the snow at Joensuu airport.

Next day, the experience at the UEF started. Kaisa picked me up, and before arriving to my new office and getting to know my new colleagues, Kaisa went with me to do some bureaucracy. We arrived, and after showing me the laboratories, she introduced me to Kukka, Kristiina, Joan and Bhabishya – all colleagues from the research group. It was time for a coffee for me but lunch for the Finnish people. After this, we made a tour for some high school students  that came to visit the laboratories.  Next day was the time to meet the supervisor, Jarkko. It was a nice meeting where we started to plan our experiments.

Me in the laboratory teaching some new techniques to a student (not high school though).

Caffeine and salicylic acid were the compounds that at the end we decided to use for our experiments. Daphnia magna and Lumbriculus variegatus being our test animals. We started acute toxicity test with interesting results. After these good results, we planned to start chronic toxicity tests with Daphnia magna but these were a bit longer that we thought because there were not enough neonates. Some weeks later, the experiments started with the first generation, followed by the second one. The third generation I could not finish, because my time in Joensuu was over. Kukka and Kaisa took care of the rest of the experiment (thank you once again).

However, not everything was just laboratory in Joensuu. I started practicing some sports (and I am not taking in consideration the rides to the centre by bike). How can I forget the spinning class with Alex (the first and the last one) or the body pump lessons with Kaisa, where I confess the first time I was afraid but then I liked it. The Finnish Conference in Environmental Science was also nice, where I had two posters and one oral communication. I spent lot of evenings with friends I met in Joensuu in JetSet bar, drinking some beers, playing board games and talking about life, something that I loved. In July, it was amazing the Ilosaarirock festival where I was volunteer and I could enjoy one of my favourite bands, Imagine Dragons. If I have the chance, I would love to come back once again to the festival.

My very first but definitely not the last BodyPump class!

August arrived, I had not realized it, and there was not snow anymore. Finally I went to Koli, a beautiful National Park with my lab colleagues, my friends, and I fell in love with those amazing landscapes.  The day arrived, 21st of that month, Kaisa picked me up as lot of days during these five months. But this time our destination wasn’t the university for working or hunting Easter eggs, we stopped at the train station. I loaded the suitcases, full of new knowledge, amazing experience and friends while we made the last pictures. The adventure arrived to the end but feeling that I will be back to this city called Joensuu.

At Koli National Park with Lake Pielinen behind.

Thank you for bringing to me this amazing opportunity.

 

Text by Eric Carmona Martinez.

Photos by Eric Carmona Martinez and Kaisa Figueiredo.

Three research grants for us: for nanosafety, method development and metal (eco)toxicity.

In the past few weeks, we have received many happy news in our research group. First, Kukka got funding from the Maj and Tor Nessling foundation for her Post doc project Searching nanosafety: Solutions for testing environmental effects of nanomaterials.

One of Kukka’s daphnids

Next, our group leader Jarkko got project funding (4 years) from the Kone foundation for developing biotests methods for evaluating the ecological effects of wastewater effluents.

Today, Kristiina received a mobility grant from Outi Savonlahti fund (Joensuu University Foundation) for initiating her Post doc project with the focus on metal bioavailability, toxicity and ecotoxicity. The mobility period shall be in Nanjing University, China.

Congratulations for everyone! And many thanks for all our collaborators for your help with writing grant proposals.

Text by Kristiina Väänänen, pictures by Kukka Pakarinen and Varpu Heiskanen.